Color Psychology

What does color psychology mean? Why are people more relaxed in green rooms? Why do weight lifters do their best in blue gyms? Colors often have different meanings in various cultures. And even in Western societies, the meanings of various colors have changed over the years. But many researchers have generally found the following to be accurate.

Black
Black is the color of authority and power. It is popular in fashion because it makes people appear thinner. It is also stylish and timeless. Black also implies submission. Priests wear black to signify submission to God. Some fashion experts say a woman wearing black implies submission to men. Black outfits can also be overpowering, or make the wearer seem aloof or evil. Villains, such as Dracula, often wear black. That’s why it’s almost never used in interiors or exteriors.
White
Brides wear White to symbolize innocence and purity. White reflects light and is considered a summer color. White is popular in decorating and in fashion because it is light, neutral, and goes with everything. However, white shows dirt and is therefore more difficult to keep clean than other colors. Doctors and nurses wear white to imply sterility.
Red
The most emotionally intense color, red stimulates a faster heartbeat and breathing. It is also the color of love. Red clothing gets noticed and makes the wearer appear heavier. Since it is an extreme color, red clothing might not help people in negotiations or confrontations. Red cars are popular targets for thieves. In decorating, red is usually used as an accent. Decorators say that red furniture should be perfect since it will attract attention. The most romantic color, pink, is more tranquilizing. Sports teams sometimes paint the locker rooms used by opposing teams bright pink so their opponents will lose energy.
Blue
The color of the sky and the ocean, Blue is one of the most popular colors. It causes the opposite reaction as red. Peaceful, tranquil blue causes the body to produce calming chemicals, so it is often used in bedrooms. Blue can also be cold and depressing. Fashion consultants recommend wearing blue to job interviews because it symbolizes loyalty. People are more productive in blue rooms. Studies show weightlifters are able to handle heavier weights in blue gyms.
Green
Currently the most popular decorating color, Green symbolizes nature. It is the easiest color on the eye and can improve vision. It is a calming, refreshing color. People waiting to appear on TV sit in "green rooms" to relax. Hospitals often use green because it relaxes patients. Brides in the middle Ages wore green to symbolize fertility. Dark green is masculine, conservative, and implies wealth.
Yellow
Cheerful sunny Yellow is an attention getter. While it is considered an optimistic color, people lose their tempers more often in yellow rooms, and babies will cry more. It is the most difficult color for the eye to take in, so it can be overpowering if overused. Yellow enhances concentration, hence its use for legal pads. It also speeds metabolism.

Color Psychology for your Home

If you like the idea of using color to create an emotionally healthy home, color consultants say you should first consider the primary function of each room. Next, pick a predominant color. Although it can't be proven scientifically, color consultants say some hues work better than others at encouraging certain activities. Here's a room-by-room rundown of the colors believed to work best in each of the most important rooms of your home, and the moods they create.

Living room and foyer paint colors.
Warm tones like reds, yellows, and oranges, and earth tones like brown and beige often work well in both the living room and foyer, because they're though to stimulate conversation. These are colors that encourage people to sit around and talk. You feel the warmth, the connection with other people.
Kitchen paint colors.
Color consultants say that if you have fond memories of spending time in the kitchen when you were a kid, it might make sense to recreate the color scheme in your grown-up kitchen. If you grew up in a blue-and-white kitchen and have great memories, blue and white may be the best colors for you and your family.
If there's no particular paint scheme you remember fondly, reds and yellows can be great colors in the kitchen as well as in the living room and foyer. But watch out if you're watching your weight: in addition to stimulating conversation, color consultants say that red may prompt you to eat more, if only subtly. If you're on a diet, you might want to keep red out of the kitchen.
Dining room paint colors.
Because it's stimulating, red decor can be great for a formal dining room. In addition to encouraging conversation, it whets the appetites of your guests. If your dining room is red, people may think you are a better cook.
Bedroom paint colors.
The bedroom is where you go to relax and reconnect with your partner.  Cool colors -- blues, greens and lavenders -- can be great choices here, because they are thought to have a calming effect. The darker the hue, the more pronounced the effect is believed to be. Reds tend to increase blood pressure and heart rate and stimulate activity. Blue does just the opposite. That's why we think of it as calming. What if your teenager has a few ideas about how to paint his or her bedroom? In the name of family harmony, it probably makes sense to let your teen pick the paint -- within reason.
Bathroom paint colors.
Whites and warm colors have always been popular choices for bathrooms, in large part because they connote cleanliness and purity. But nowadays the bathroom is used not just as a place to wash up, but also as a private retreat for relaxation and rejuvenation. Most people feel comfortable with blues and greens and turquoises because these colors give a sense of being clean and fresh -- and calm.
Workout room paint colors.
Reds and oranges can help you move. But they can also make you feel hot. For this reason, blues and greens may be better choices here. Yellow-greens and blue-greens may be the best choices because, in terms of color psychology, as they're "happier." 
Home office paint colors.
The name of the game here is productivity: the faster you complete work-related tasks, the more time you'll have to spend enjoying family and friends. And color consultants agree that green can be a great choice for a home office. Green is the color of concentration. It's one of the best colors to be surrounded by for long periods of time.